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have a 350 4 bolt main and want to rebuild!!!

 
jds72076
I love my Chevy Chevette!
Posts: 2
Joined: 03/08
Posted: 03/19/08 02:15 PM

i bought a 1970 monte carlo thats has a 350 4-bolt in it, it was recently rebuilt and has lots of new goodies on it. the only problem is, the oilpan has a hole about the size of a golf ball on the front left side of it. the previous owner told me he wasnt running it hard when it blew, but he also told me it sounded funny that morning and blew that evening. my guess maybe some over looked flaws in the rods during the rebuild. the is going to be my first attempt to rebuild a v-8 engine. i havent really been around a lot of rebuilding or barely know anything about it. any suggestions other than hiring someone to do it? whats the first thing i need to do? the previous owner said the crank has been turned once.....any suggestions appreciated  

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wieder
My first time was in a Chevy
Posts: 214
Joined: 03/08
Posted: 03/19/08 05:10 PM

Tear it down to just a long block and let a machine shop do the rest of the disassembly.Have them call you and show you all the damage they found whenever they get to it, a good machine shop is always backed up.Establish a good relationship with whomever you choose and talk to them before you buy any parts for the 350 when that time comes. WIEDER  

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jds72076
I love my Chevy Chevette!
Posts: 2
Joined: 03/08
Posted: 03/20/08 10:11 AM

should I remove the heads? if so is there anything i should know before i do? also it there anything i should do or know before i start, such as a certain way of removing bolts in any specific order? i am very mechanically inclined but im a rookie at doing this....thanks for all the help!!!!!  

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wieder
My first time was in a Chevy
Posts: 214
Joined: 03/08
Posted: 03/20/08 07:59 PM

If your curious,sure take the heads off and for good practice loosen bolts in sequence like if you were installing the heads.Which is usally clockwise and work your way out from the center of the head some might disagree and might have a better method it's not as important as installing I think but it's a good habit to establish.Let us know what the vehicle is along w/trans type rear gears   WIEDER  

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wieder
My first time was in a Chevy
Posts: 214
Joined: 03/08
Posted: 03/20/08 10:51 PM

Oh Ya Uh 70 Monte  

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towletransport
I love my Chevy Chevette!
Posts: 12
Joined: 03/08
Posted: 03/21/08 12:15 PM

I need some advice on chosing a cam for my chevy 350 bargain basement summit crate motor.Its has an edelbrock performer intake on it with 4-barrel quadrajet.I was told to consider comp cams high energy or extreme energy cams.My plan is to bolt on torqer heads by world products,67cc combustion chambers,170 cc runners.  

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canted
I have an SS396 tatoo
Posts: 499
Joined: 02/08
Posted: 03/21/08 05:47 PM

Before you put a great deal of work into this engine, j. You may want to pull it and remove the pan. With a rod hole in the pan, you may find out that this engine is not worth repairing. With the engine turning thousands of RPM's, it is a safe bet that the rod whacked things other than the pan. The crankshaft could be history and even the block itself. With that kind of damage, you would be money ahead swaping the "goodies" to another shortblock.  
Jim
70 El Camino
461 solid, m20,
pics in readers rides
thanks for over 3000 views

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leviakashock
My first time was in a Chevy
Posts: 135
Joined: 10/07
Posted: 03/21/08 06:13 PM

I disagree with almost everything that "Weider" said.  I say unless you are rich you should take the entire motor apart on your own. it isn't hard just start taking off parts, if you see a bolt holding a part take the bolt off.  you may want to buy a lot of zip lock bags so you can keep your bolts in order.(put the bolts in the bag and label the bag)  also i have never heard anybody say to tale the head bolts off in the order that you put them on and i have never heard any body say to tighten the bolts clockwise.  you  do head bolts just like lug nuts, you start on one bolt and then you do the farthest bolt from it and then you just keep on in that pattern usually you will torque to 70ft/pds then wait a few minutes and go to 75 and then wait and go to 80  anyway if you want to do the work, and it sounds like you do then just start pulling stuff off.  then you won't waste a bunch of money paying a machine shop to take apart you busted motor.  and if it is good then you can take them the bare block and heads and tell them what you want done to it.  

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wieder
My first time was in a Chevy
Posts: 214
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Posted: 03/21/08 06:55 PM

Machine shops know what to look for when tearing down a blown engine,no it's not a {bunch of money}.      I suggest you get manuals look up tech articles on the net if you don't believe me.First thing that you should look up is head bolt tightning sequence.Yes you can tell them what you want and they will also tell want you need. .................Lug nuts????????????? By the way it's     W I E D E R  

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leviakashock
My first time was in a Chevy
Posts: 135
Joined: 10/07
Posted: 03/22/08 11:47 AM

what happened did i offend you?  wow.  i thought this was a forum of public opinion.  not a place for arguments.  machine shops do cost a bunch of money. i had two heads milled and a vacuum test done and it cost me $300.00.  maybe that is not a lot to you but it is to most people.  in order to have them take your whole motor apart that would be at least as much. i would rather spend the time doing it myself and bring them the bare motor to look at, and keep most of the money.  why are you so sensitive.  and im not a moron i just used the lug nut analogy because of the pattern you tighten the bolts.  that would be easier for an unexperienced person to understand because most people do know how to tighten lug nuts.  that i show you teach people who ask a question.  he specifically asked for methods other then taking it to a shop.  

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leviakashock
My first time was in a Chevy
Posts: 135
Joined: 10/07
Posted: 03/22/08 11:50 AM

also you comment about machine shops "telling you what you need".  if that is what he wants them to do then he can take it to them and say "tell me what i need" you are very defensive.  

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wieder
My first time was in a Chevy
Posts: 214
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Posted: 03/22/08 06:37 PM

Pleassssse would somebody else back me up on at least 1 thing I said,  HELP ME!  WIEDER  

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GibTG
I mow my lawn and find Chevys
Posts: 1985
Joined: 10/03
Posted: 03/22/08 08:48 PM

It's difficult for me to take a side in this argument because I disagree with both of you!

Nine times out of ten a machine shop is not a cure-all. I find it very difficult to really find a competent machine shop, it just isn't in the numbers for it turn out that way...

Of the common machinist 85% of their work will be for stock rebuilds, NOT PERFORMANCE ENGINES! We have to realize that the engines we deal with are such a special case and need a whole different outlook when building them than a common machinist is going to have.

There are devoted performance engine machine shops out there but they are few and far between because of the lack of demand and the resulting astronomical prices for their work. In most cases, it's true that you get what you pay for, but people are scared of high prices. If a hard-headed old machinist fills someone's head full of hearsay, wivestales, and benchracing theory they can usually convince them they know what they're doing and they will steal the business from someone 'better'.

Even though I find it so difficult to find decent machinists I know that the average racer cannot push the boundaries of his or her own ability/knowledge too far. Having a good relationship with the best machinist you can I think is very important to being a successful engine builder but it's usually a very difficult job filtering the useful information from the B.S.

I could probably say for one to truly be a top tier engine builder that you probably almost have to be your own machinist. Then it would be your job to constantly learn and correct whatever problems you encounter instead of going from machinist to machinist trying to find out if he will be able to actually make something work for you...

Either the hobby or business of performance engines is a difficult one to explain. It deals with these incredibly complex systems that are expensive to build and expensive to maintain. Of course they accomplish incredible feats but that's why they cost so much. So many racers face this incredibly expensive dilemma and stare all of these intertwined sciences right in the eye and then don't have the desire to get in very deep, so to speak. For these reasons (and many others I'm sure I haven't mentioned) racers like to hear what they want to rather than what they should. Who knows, maybe it has something to do with the people that are attracted to the sport or even the nature of people as well but that's a whole other rant!  
~Gibs

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wieder
My first time was in a Chevy
Posts: 214
Joined: 03/08
Posted: 03/22/08 10:19 PM

I have one of those 1 out of 10 machine shops I guess,they're going to be involved in some of the process.I think having a good additude towards a machine shop helps,the few engines I've put together, I pretty much use them for the equipment that most of us don't have.Yes like Gibtg say's, If you want to keep the machine shop least involved as possible you better start filling up with a lot of information on your rebuild. Anybody Else? WIEDER  

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leviakashock
My first time was in a Chevy
Posts: 135
Joined: 10/07
Posted: 03/22/08 10:38 PM

i never said i don't like machine shops.  i simply read this guys question and answered it to the best of my knowledge.  and his last sentence was can you give me some info OTHER THAN to take it to someone else.  i use the shop also, i just do as much as i possibly can on my own. obviously i cannot bore my own cylinders and stroke my own motor so i go to the sho p for that.  but when it comes to porting and polishing my intake and heads i do it myself.  and if it comes to something as easy as taking a motor apart i am surely going to do it myself.  i find absolutely zero enjoyment in paying someone else to build me a fast/strong motor.  to me the journey of doing as much of the work as humanly possible iss where the enjoyment comes from.  when i run a quarter in the 10's with no nitrous and i know that I DID THAT.  NOT SOME GUY AT THE MACHINE SHOP.  i built the motor and it just ran 10's. that is what it is all about, to me.  

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